Never Judge a Narrator by their Cover

Horror movies

Lorna Raver is a film and stage actress who also has a career as an audiobook narrator. She records for many publishers, her next to be about the public school system titled “These Schools Belong to You and Me.” Her longtime companion was the late great Yuri Rasovsky, the Grammy winning radio drama icon. Lorna starred in a horror movie DRAG ME TO HELL, directed by Sam Raimi (very much out of character for her…she’s a sweet lady, whom I met at the Audie awards in LA.)

 

JONATHAN LOWE: Which came first for you–stage acting or voice acting?

 

LORNA RAVER: I started as a stage actor and stage acting will always be closest to my heart. I love inhabiting another life. I love the discipline of stage work, the challenge of re-creating night after night while keeping it fresh, the interaction with other actors – and with the audience, the exercise of all your skills – mental, spiritual and physical. My first experience with voice acting came about when I was hired to do a play for Yuri Rasovsky’s prestigious National Radio Theatre in Chicago. As is the case with most stage actors who do audio drama, I had a ball! Learning how to convey vocally what one might express physically on stage was very exciting, and there’s no better teacher for that than Yuri.

 

Q: What are the difficulties and similarities involved?

 

A: Discovering the emotional resonance of your character and the play as a whole is not significantly different from stage acting, but the techniques required of the actor are different. For example, you may have an emotionally intense scene with another actor but because of a necessary mic set-up, you may not be able to make eye contact with that actor – you must convey all the interaction with your voice. You really learn how to listen! And you really learn how to mean what you say and say what you mean! Of course, voice acting broadens your casting opportunities, too. If you can realistically sound like an old person or a child, you can be hired to play one, even though you may be neither.

 

Q: I can’t think of any narrators who haven’t acted on stage or on TV at the very least, although I’m sure there must be some. What must a TV or film actor learn in order to make the transition to voice acting, given that he or she can’t be seen?

 

A: Audiobook narration, to me, is not as closely related to stage acting as is audio drama. Fiction narration certainly requires the ability to “act” the characters in the book and to honor the arc of the narrative, but audiobooks present other challenges different from stage, TV or film acting. Technically, there is the simple fact that you are restricted in movement for long stretches of time. You’re sitting in a booth and you need to be always aware of mic position. Audiobook narration can be grueling and requires mental and vocal stamina. It is incredibly focused work. I am blessed with vocal stamina so that after hours of recording, it is rarely my voice that goes, it is my brain!

 

Q: What about creating multiple character voices?

 

A: When it comes to creating different voices for different characters, I don’t feel that I have a good vocabulary for describing that process technically. It’s related to the same process one would use creating a character for stage, film or TV, except that an audiobook may require a dozen different characters not of the narrator’s age, gender or race, all of which need to be distinct, identifiable and consistent. Listening to and practicing voices and accents are useful, but you also need to apply them appropriately. If you really want a tutorial on how to broaden your “voice library,” go out for an evening with Barbara Rosenblat. She studies the sound of everyone she encounters from the cab driver to the waiter to the lady eating at the next table!

 

Q: What a great suggestion! Have interviewed her. She’s fantastic. Now, was it easier for you to transition to film acting than it might be for someone doing the reverse, do you think?

 

A: I didn’t really transition from audio to film since, while I had done audio drama before I worked in film, it was only after I had done a substantial amount of stage and TV and some film work that I began narrating audio books. However, the difficulty of audiobook narration is often underrated by those who haven’t done it. On more than one occasion while working on a film or TV show, I’ve had other actors tell me that they tried narrating audiobooks and it was just too hard! Episodic TV requires stamina, but the work flow is so different. You shoot a scene then break then shoot again then break and so on rather than spend an hour or more at a time in the booth recording.

 

Q: What types of audiobooks do you most enjoy narrating?

 

A: All types. I like the diversity of narrating both fiction and non-fiction. I think fiction is much more demanding and having the occasional non-fiction break is refreshing to me.

 

Q: Full cast must be a lot of fun, working with Yuri. I only met him once, after he produced my novel Fame Island. Radio drama is the only acting I’ve tried myself, as solo narration is beyond me. As a medium, it is very time consuming and therefore rare. Any favorites there?

 

A: The kick you get from acting in audio drama is closest to the kick from working on stage! Yuri is such a skilled audio director, and always gets wonderful actors for his productions, so I’m ready to go whenever he has something he thinks I’m right for. I had a chance to do some “audio noir” or channel my inner Barbara Stanwyck! in his Hollywood Theatre of the Ear production of BLACK MASK AUDIO MAGAZINE for Blackstone Audio, and also had a good time playing a Brit in his Audie Award winning production of THE SHERLOCK HOLMES THEATRE, also for Blackstone Audio.

 

Q: In non-fiction, I see you’ve recently narrated CHEAP–The High Cost of Discount Culture. What was the research like?

 

A: My main goals in non-fiction narration are clarity and conveying the “mood” of the book. The research involved in preparing for a non-fiction read is often much more extensive and time-consuming than for fiction. For example, I read two books on ancient Egypt for Tantor: TEMPLES, TOMBS & HIEROGLYPHS and RED LAND, BLACK LAND both by Barbara Mertz, and which involved major research. It is of invaluable assistance when the author is available for consultation, as was the case with those two books, but you don’t always have an author contact. One thing I really like about non-fiction narration is that I learn so much – especially about topics I would not necessarily be drawn to otherwise.

Furman
Lorna Raver has narrated both Cujo by Stephen King and an audiobook about Mother Teresa.

Lorna Raver:

Barbara Rosenblat:

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